Class resources & other points of interest:

Mythology 1 Readings

Mythology 1 Readings

All the Greek and Roman texts.

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Mythology 2 Readings

Mythology 2 Readings

All the Norse, Egyptian, &c. texts.

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English 10 Readings

English 10
Readings

Texts and assigned questions, here.

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Arabian Readings

Arabian Nights Readings

Stories from
RTI class.

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Mythology
Tests

Mythology
Tests

Find your online test
here!

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English
Class Log

English Class
Log

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class activities.

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Calendar

RCHS
Calendar

The latest RCHS
events. Updated often.

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Forum

Ferrellweb
Forum

Discussions,
sometimes.

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MUSH

MUSH

An experimental text environment, mostly abandoned.

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Board Game
Café

Board Game
Café

Preview our games and find something to play.

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CommonLit

CommonLit

A direct link to the CommonLit login page, just for you.

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Quill

Quill

A login shortcut to Quill.org’s grammar and writing exercises.

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I’m currently reading:

The Matchbox That Ate a Forty-Ton Truck: What Everyday Things Tell Us about the Universe by Marcus Chowngoodreads.com

The Matchbox That Ate a Forty-Ton Truck: What Everyday Things Tell Us about the Universe

Marcus Chown

Look around you. The reflection of your face in a window tells you about the most shocking discovery in the history of science: that at its deepest level the world is orchestrated by chance; that ultimately, things happen for no reason at all. The iron in a spot of blood on your finger shows you that somewhere out in space there is a furnace at a temperature of 4.5 billion degrees. Static on your TV screen proclaims that the universe had a beginning. The bulb above your head emits light, and the light waves emerging from it are about five thousand times bigger than the atoms that spit them out–as paradoxical a thought as the idea of a matchbox swallowing a forty-ton truck.
Marcus Chown takes familiar features of the everyday world and shows us, with breathtaking clarity, wit, and suspense, how they can be used to explain profound truths about the ultimate nature of reality. This is an essential cosmology primer for anyone curious about their surroundings and their place in the universe.

I’ve recently finished reading these:

  • Pandora's Jar: Women in the Greek Myths by Natalie Haynes
  • The Abominable by Dan Simmons
  • Where There's a Will (Nero Wolfe, #8) by Rex Stout
  • Wonders Will Never Cease: A Novel by Robert Irwin
  • Imajica by Clive Barker
  • King Solomon's Mines (Allan Quatermain, #1) by H. Rider Haggard
  • The Dark Forest (Remembrance of Earth’s Past, #2) by Liu Cixin
  • The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth’s Past, #1) by Liu Cixin

Board games I’ve played lately: